Kyle Craft – Tickets – Doug Fir Lounge – Portland, OR – November 30th, 2016

Kyle Craft

Rising singer-songwriter with a heavy dose of Southern-style rock and roll

Kyle Craft

Nick Delffs

November, 30th, 2016

Doors: 8:00 pm / Show: 9:00 pm

$12.00 - $13.00

This event is 21 and over

Kyle Craft
Kyle Craft
Kyle Craft grew up in a tiny Louisiana town on the banks of the Mississippi, where he spent most of his time catching alligators and rattlesnakes instead of playing football or picking up the guitar. He's not the born product of a musical family, and bands never came through town -- it was only a chance trip to K-Mart that gave him his first album, a David Bowie hits compilation that helped inspire him eventually to channel his innate feral energy into songwriting and rock and roll.

That self-made talent drives every note of 'Dolls of Highland,' Craft's exhilarating, fearless solo debut. "This album is the dark corner of a bar," he says. "It's that feeling at the end of the night when you're confronted with 'now what?'"

Craft knows the feeling well -- 'Dolls' began to take shape when everything he took for granted was suddenly over, including an eight-year relationship. "All of a sudden I was left with just me for the first time in my adult life," he says. He decided to get himself and the music he'd been working on far away from the ghosts of his home in Shreveport, Louisiana, to make a new life for himself in Portland, Oregon, living under a friend's pool table while he demoed new songs and started to tackle his own question about what came next.

'Dolls of Highland' crashes open with "Eye of a Hurricane," a whirlwind of ragtime piano and Craft's dynamic, enthralling vocals. He calls it a "jealous song," stirred up by the memories of an ill-fated crush and a drama of "weird little connections, a spider web of what the fuck?"

The swinging, resonant "Lady of the Ark" is also tied up in that web, "a very incestuous song," says Craft. "It's about these messed up relationships, maybe involving me, maybe revolving around me." Most of the characters and atmospheres on the album come from in and around Shreveport, where Craft briefly returned while recording the album for an intensely productive reckoning with his past. He stayed in a friend's laundry room in the Highland neighborhood, where he recorded the whole album in two months on a home studio rig. "I dedicated the album to Shreveport and called it 'Dolls of Highland' for all the girls and ghosts in town who influenced it so strongly."

Craft eventually returned to Portland where Brandon Summers and Benjamin Weikel of The Helio Sequence helped refine and mix the album to move it from its DIY beginnings to a more fully realized work. Craft played most of the instruments on the album, but the recorded songs transmit the power of his live performance. "It's just letting go," says Craft. "I think it's just all about feeling it in your chest."

And then there's Craft's unforgettable voice -- "I'm fully aware that I have a very abrasive, very loud voice, but Bob Dylan is the one that taught me to embrace that," says Craft. "I stray away from him from time to time, but always come back. I don't want to come off as antique, but I also don't want to be afraid of paying homage to the stuff I've always loved." With those influences as inspiration, Craft's talent and singular creativity move the conversation into new and unpredictable places.

And no question, this album is very much about moving forward. "After everything fell apart, it didn't take very long for me to learn who I was and what I should be doing," says Craft, who is walking out on the other side with 'Dolls of Highland.'
Nick Delffs
Nick Delffs
Nick Delffs is a seeker. He’d never identify himself that way. He’s unassuming and self-effacing, careful to discuss song meanings and biographical details without indulgence or melodrama. Delffs cut his teeth playing basement shows in Portland a dozen years ago, just before that city’s cover was irreversibly blown. It was a time when being musically ambitious meant impressing other local musicians. You were a joke, in that world, if you proclaimed yourself an artist or promoted your band with any zeal. So Delffs would probably find “seeker” a rather grandiose title.

But Nick Delffs is, in fact, a seeker. He’s an old-school rustler of the human condition; a tireless navigator of social and spiritual landscapes; a genuinely curious and wide-eyed, mankind-enthusiast. Soon after meeting him, one gets the impression that Delffs could be dropped in some far corner of the Earth and he’d not only survive, but he’d make a lot of friends—maybe even start a new band. In both casual conversation and his songwriting, Delffs gravitates to the universal. That’s his search. His life’s work is in the identification and removal of our shared illusions. And that is, largely, what Delffs writes songs about. Songs come to him when he’s “feeling detached from the world but totally in love with it at the same time,” he says. “Mostly they come when I am patient and I don't need them or care about them too much.”

They happen to be pretty catchy songs. Delffs first emerged in 2003 as the frontman for the seminal Portland band The Shaky Hands, known for their jangly, pulsing and introspective songs and their high-energy live shows. The band would sign to the venerable Kill Rock Stars imprint and tour internationally with bands like The Shins and Meat Puppets.

The Shaky Hands went on hiatus in 2011, and the changes came fast and furious for Delffs. He released a stripped-down, self-titled EP as Death Songs. He became a father. He relocated to Idaho. He took odd jobs and worked as a landscaper. All the while, he was strengthening his musical chops by collaborating with artists like Luz Elena Mendoza (Y La Bamba) and Ali Clarys—both of whom play important roles on his new LP, Redesign.

Living in Boise, Delffs remained a beloved figure throughout the Northwest—traveling often and moonlighting in friends’ touring bands. Slowly, through collaboration and time off, the pressure of being a full-time songwriter subsided and a thrilling new confidence emerged in Delffs’ own work.

“I like to disassociate myself with being a songwriter,” he says. “I like to forget I even do it. In the past that would have freaked me out, but I have a healthier relationship with my songs now. It’s less codependent.”

Redesign is the first full-length album Delffs has ever released under his own name. He first shed the Death Songs moniker in 2015, when he unceremoniously dropped a four-track EP of fantastic story-songs simply titled Home Recordings, and last year Mama Bird released Delffs’ reworking of the traditional English Christmas carol, “As I Sat on a Sunny Bank”. But Redesign is a self-contained universe of songs that play with themes that, on the surface, seem at odds with one another: longing for nature (“Somewhere Wild”, an ode to off-the-grid living) and learning to take responsibility (“Song for Aja”, a sweet and percussive tune about Delffs’ now six-year-old son that recalls Cat Stevens and Paul Simon). Musically, these themes are stitched together by the album’s warm, organic production and Delffs’ playing—he’s behind every instrument on the record—but Delffs also connects those seemingly disparate dots under the heading of Redesign. Heading into wilderness provides the insight for dealing with life’s heaviness; the responsibility of being a parent is also an opportunity for endless imaginative self-exploration.

The title track “Redesign” was written during a rafting trip in Eastern Oregon. “I couldn't go for the full three days, so I went for one day and hiked back to my car alone,” Delffs says. “It took maybe nine hours, and I had no shoes, and there were rattlesnakes. I took naps, I sang in caves. I felt like I let a lot of things go on that walk.”

A redesign means “to change out the parts of yourself that don't work, or don't serve anyone,” Delffs explains. “And if you are changing and growing, your relationships have to as well. It seems like redesigning our relationship with the world—and staying open to change and curious about the future—is more important now than ever.”

This is what you can depend on from Nick Delffs. In a world of noise and madness, he will use his music to try and scratch at something human and real. Something helpful. Nick Delffs is a seeker. He shares his discoveries. Redesign is his greatest gift yet.